Psychology

Psychology is the scientific study of the human mind and behaviour: how we think, feel, act and interact individually and in groups. Psychologists study human behaviour by observing, measuring and testing, then arriving at conclusions that are rooted in sound scientific methodology, applying what they learn to illuminate our understanding and improve the world around us. The real world application of Psychology is extensive, from treating mental illness to maximising productivity in the workplace, and increasing all the time.

Course Type

AS and A Level

Entry requirements

  • Level 6 in GCSE English Language
  • Grade B in GCSE Core and Additional Science or Grade B in GCSE Biology
  • Level 5 in GCSE Mathematics

Course breakdown

In Year 12, you will study a range of topics, including:

  • Memory
  • Attachment
  • Social Influence
  • Psychopathology
  • Psychological Approaches
  • Research Methods

In Year 13, you will build on your first year of study, exploring more advanced topics including:

  • Forensic Psychology
  • Relationships
  • Eating Behaviour
  • Further Research Methods

How will the course be assessed?

At the end of Year 12, you will be entered for the AS level in Psychology. This will assess the content and skills covered in the first year of study.

  • Exam: Introductory Topics in Psychology – 1.5 hours – 50% of AS level
  • Exam: Psychology in Context – 1.5 hours – 50% of AS level

At the end of Year 13, students will be entered for the A level in Psychology. This will assess the content and skills covered in both years of study.

  • Exam: Introductory Topics in Psychology – 2 hours – 33.3% of A level
  • Exam: Psychology in Context – 2 hours – 33.3% of A level
  • Exam: Issues and options in Psychology – 2 hours – 33.3% of A level

Note that this is a reformed A level. This means that the grades obtained for the AS level do not contribute to the final A level grade.

Where can the course lead?

Studying Psychology will help develop skills that are transferable to a number of jobs and professions, including law, business, medicine, journalism, marketing, advertising, personnel work, management and many more.

You can continue to study Psychology or related subjects, such as Criminology, at university. This can lead to a career as a Psychologist in any of the specialist areas, such as occupational, child, clinical, criminal or educational psychology, or to work in related fields such as social services, probation or youth work, the police and teaching.